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Pr. Luc Averous



- Sorry, I don't sell, buy or produce bioplastics or biobased materials!
- Thank you very much for reading this blog!



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List of companies producing Biodegradable Plastics

• Basf
• Biocorp, Inc.
• Biologische Naturverpackungen Gmgh & Co. Kg (Biotec)
• Biomatera
• Biomer
• Biopolymer Technologies Ag (Biop)
• Cereplast
• Danimer Scientific/Meredian
• Earthshell Corporation
• Fabri-Kal
• Fkur Plastics Corp.
• Futerro
• Galactic Sa
• Huhtamaki, Inc.
• Innovia Films, Ltd
• Japan Corn Starch Co., Ltd
• Metabolix
• Mitsui Chemicals
• Natureworks Llc
• Novamont
• Plantic Technologies Ltd
• Plaxica
• Polyone
• Purac America
• Pyramid Bioplastics Guben Gmbh
• Rodenburg Biopolymers B.V.
• Rtp Co.
• Synbra Technology
• Teknor-Apex
• Teijin
• Tianan Biologic Material Company
• Tianjin Green Bio-Science Co., Ltd.
• Toray
• Toyobo Company, Ltd
• Treofan Germany Gmbh & Co. Kg
• Uhde Inventa-Fischer Gmbh
• Vegeplast
• Zhejiang Hisun Biomaterials Co.


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Last news about Conferences on biobased and/or biodegradable polymers, bioplastics, (Last Twitter Notifications)

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Last news about the Bioplastics World, and more … (Updated Twitter notifications)

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Follow me on twitter!

Bio-Pol Blog has been very active during more than 3 years (Since Feb. 2008), with around 600 posts and 1000 comments, in English, French, Spanish or Portuguese. All it needs now is to rest, a little bit!
I have enjoyed during this period the interactions with you. Thank you very much for reading this blog!

Now, To know the lastest news and information on bioplastics … Follow me on twitter!
http://twitter.com/LucAverous

I hope to meet you on twitter!

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Bioplastics from chicken feathers


Feathers, like hair and fingernails, are made up principally of the tough and chemically stable protein keratin, and can lend strength while reducing weight in the mixtures of plastics chemicals known as composites.
Researchers at the US agricultural authority have even published research into the possibility of incorporating chicken feathers into plastics, as an additive in composites that are made largely of a chemical polymer. But the work presented by Yiqi Yang, from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, takes this idea further and uses the chicken feather fibres themselves as a principal ingredient – making up 50% of the mass of the composite.

“If used as composite materials, no polyethylene or polypropylene are needed. Therefore [the plastics] will be more degradable and more sustainable.” Professor Yang’s team processed chicken feathers and added a chemical known as methyl acrylate to turn them into a plastic, from which they made thin films.
These films were tougher than comparable formulations using other biowaste materials, and Professor Yang said that a crucial advantage of the team’s approach was that their plastics are much more resistant to water.
Renko Akkerman, technical director of the Thermoplastic Composite Research Centre in the Netherlands, said that, depending on the application, feather-derived composites could be a strong addition to the palette of plastics.

“For each material you can do things at a very minor scale, but making the transition to mass production is a large one and only then can you truly grade the performance in terms of economics, carbon footprint, and so on.
“Despite all that we should pursue things like these, try and use biomaterials – certainly if it’s waste otherwise – and make something useful.”
To know more

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